Want help finding your dream job? This new LinkedIn tool and study is very cool, and I wanted to share it with you. I liked this quote from the LinkedIn press release:

“The dream jobs we aspire to as children are a window into our passions and talents,” said Nicole Williams, LinkedIn’s career expert. “Identifying and understanding those passions are key to improving our performance and enjoyment of the jobs we currently do, even if they aren’t specific to the careers we dreamed of as kids.”

I wanted to be a mermaid when I was a kid. I grew up in Florida and watched the mermaids at Weekie Watchie with jealousy. They got to wear cool costumes and swim around in the water all day. I just thought I wanted to be as beautiful as they were. How does that relate to my being a career coach? It doesn’t…necessarily. But some of the things I enjoyed as a child do relate to being a career coach. I was on TV a couple of times and loved it. I enjoy the speaking and marketing element of what I do as a business owner a lot. Also as a child I was always the one people would come to talk to or share their secrets with when they were having a hard time. I enjoyed being someone they could lean on.

There are possible clues to your dream job in childhood aspirations. Look at them and keep these two things in mind:

  • First, look at and consider your childhood aspirations for ideas for your career path, but don’t just look at them at face value. Look underneath, what were those aspirations about and what was beneath them? Helping people, entertaining them, or inspiring them? Just because you wanted to be a fire fighter doesn’t mean that’s your dream job. Some of the reasons you wanted to be a fire fighter might give you some themes to pursue as a start. Or it could be exactly what you want to do. Either way is ok; just don’t be too rigid or literal about it.
  • Second, don’t get trapped in thinking “I’ve always wanted to do this” or “I’m so good at it I HAVE to do it mentality.” I worked with a career coaching client, Zach, recently and he was continuing to pursue a career path just because he felt he should since he was good at it – even though he didn’t truly enjoy it. When finding your dream job you have to try to not get caught up with what you “should” do.

If you’d like more help with identifying your dream job, career coaching could be exactly what you need. Please contact us today for a complimentary consultation.

Hallie Crawford
Career Path Coach

P.S. Are you frustrated with your job search? Check out our FREE REPORT: ”Take Control of Your Career Transition: Uncover Hidden Opportunities”.